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AVILES BROTHERS
DUCK AND DOVE HUNTING CLUB
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Cinnamon teal (Anas cyanoptera septentrionalium)

Description

Males have a cinnamon-red head, neck, breast, and belly. They have an iridescent green speculum which is separated from a bluish shoulder patch by a white stripe. The back, rump, uppertail coverts, and tail are a dull brown and the undertail coverts are black. They have a distinctive red eye, and yellow feet and legs. Females are similar to the female blue-winged teal except for the blue shoulder patch is duller, they have an overall rustier color, and they are more heavily streaked.

Average length: M 16", F 15?"

Average weight: M 0.7 lbs., F 0.8 lbs

Migrating and Wintering

Nearly all cinnamon teal winter in Mexico and Central America. During migration they stopover in the Great Salt Lake marshes and Central Valley of California. Cinnamon teal sighted in the midwest and eastern United States, often are associated with a flock of blue-winged teal, most likely attaching themselves to the flock at their mutual breeding grounds. 

Breeding

Most cinnamon teal breed in the western United States. The Great Salt Lake, Malheur Basin, San Luis Valley, and Cariboo-Chilcotin parklands are all used by breeding cinnamon teal. They prefer small, shallow alkaline wetlands surrounded by low herbaceous cover. Nests are often located in grassy areas and island nesting is common.

 

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